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Mavis Warrngilnga Ganambarr, Worrwurr (Owl) Sculpture 16.5cm
  • Aboriginal Art - Mavis Warrngilnga Ganambarr, Worrwurr (Owl) Sculpture 16.5cm
  • Aboriginal Art - Mavis Warrngilnga Ganambarr, Worrwurr (Owl) Sculpture 16.5cm
  • Aboriginal Art - Mavis Warrngilnga Ganambarr, Worrwurr (Owl) Sculpture 16.5cm
Aboriginal Art - Mavis Warrngilnga Ganambarr, Worrwurr (Owl) Sculpture 16.5cm
Aboriginal Art - Mavis Warrngilnga Ganambarr, Worrwurr (Owl) Sculpture 16.5cm
Aboriginal Art - Mavis Warrngilnga Ganambarr, Worrwurr (Owl) Sculpture 16.5cm

Mavis Warrngilnga Ganambarr, Worrwurr (Owl) Sculpture 16.5cm

$859.00
  • Aboriginal Artist - Mavis Warrngilnga Ganambarr
  • Community - Elcho Island
  • Aboriginal Art Centre - Elcho Island Arts
  • Catalogue number - 21-69
  • Materials - Pandanus and natural dyes
  • Size(cm) - H16.5 W13.5 D16

The fibre works of artists from Elcho Island and surrounding homelands are handmade using traditional techniques passed down from generation to generation. They are constructed from the fibre of the Pandanas leaves and Kurrajong plant which is coloured with natural dyes collected from local plant materials such as leaves and roots. The Pandanus fibre is boiled with these special roots, leaves and seeds to produce an array of colours. Once dried the Pandanus fibre is woven into uniquely designed fibre art.

Mavis Warrngilna Ganambarr was is one of Australia’s leading fibre artists. She was born at Matamata Homeland in North East Arnhem Land and now lives at Galiwin’ku on Elcho Island with her husband, children and grandchildren. Mavis is the daughter of Mowarra (father) and Gunanu (mother). After being taught fibre art by her grandmother at 19, she has spent years experimenting and creating new styles of weaving and wearable art. She is a Telstra Award finalist, has work held in various public art galleries and museums across Australia, and has been exhibited widely in both group and solo shows. Her most recent exhibition was ‘My Island Home’, a collection of wearable art pieces held at Sydney’s Burring Gallery. Mavis is the Artist Liaison Officer at Elcho Island Arts.

Mavis’ own story

“Bapa Shepie (Missionary) brought me to Galiwin’ku when I was 9 years old so I could go to school. I was taught fibre art by my grandmother Djuluka when I was 19 years of age and I have been continually creating weavings and wearable art since then. I am very proud of what my grandmother taught me to do, but now I am making different, new styles of my own ideas. I teach my children and one day they will teach their children. In this way we will keep our culture strong.”

Mavis has exhibited across Australia including in 2004 “A Matter of Time”, Tamworth 16th Fibre Textile Biennial toured Australia in 2001, the 18th Telstra National Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Art Awards, Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory. She has also held a solo exhibition Gunga Djama Mirr (Pandanus Work) at the Bandigan Art and Crafts Gallery Sydney, 2001. Her works have been acquired by National Gallery of Victoria and is included in the Kerry Stokes Collection.

In February 2010 Mavis participated in the Yuta Badayala (New Light) project and exhibition. Yuta Badayala (New Light) is the product of a joint project between Sydney based design company, Koskela, and Yolngu women fibre artists working with Elcho Island Arts in North East Arnhem Land. The aim of the project was to give Yolngu women the opportunity to transfer their traditional weaving techniques onto new forms so that long-held cultural practices and art making skills could be seen ‘in a new light’. The project also aims to develop new markets for Indigenous fibre art. The project provided Mavis with the opportunity to translate her traditional techniques onto a new form.

Text: Copyright Elcho Island Arts

Elcho Island Arts is located in Galiwin’ku, the main community on Elcho Island. Art styles produced by over 200 Yolngu artists include the iconic Banumbirr (Morning Star Poles), bark paintings, hollow logs, 3-D and sculptural works, soft sculpture and fibre art, yidaki (didgeridoos), artefacts, jewellery, paintings on canvas, prints and works on paper. 

 

 





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