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Lloyd Jampijinpa Brown, Doors 12 - Karnta Jukurrpa (Women Dreaming), 122x76cm
  • Aboriginal Art - Lloyd Jampijinpa Brown, Doors 12 - Karnta Jukurrpa (Women Dreaming), 122x76cm
  • Aboriginal Art - Lloyd Jampijinpa Brown, Doors 12 - Karnta Jukurrpa (Women Dreaming), 122x76cm
  • Aboriginal Art - Lloyd Jampijinpa Brown, Doors 12 - Karnta Jukurrpa (Women Dreaming), 122x76cm
  • Aboriginal Art - Lloyd Jampijinpa Brown, Doors 12 - Karnta Jukurrpa (Women Dreaming), 122x76cm
Aboriginal Art - Lloyd Jampijinpa Brown, Doors 12 - Karnta Jukurrpa (Women Dreaming), 122x76cm
Aboriginal Art - Lloyd Jampijinpa Brown, Doors 12 - Karnta Jukurrpa (Women Dreaming), 122x76cm
Aboriginal Art - Lloyd Jampijinpa Brown, Doors 12 - Karnta Jukurrpa (Women Dreaming), 122x76cm
Aboriginal Art - Lloyd Jampijinpa Brown, Doors 12 - Karnta Jukurrpa (Women Dreaming), 122x76cm

Lloyd Jampijinpa Brown, Doors 12 - Karnta Jukurrpa (Women Dreaming), 122x76cm

$1,369.00
  • Aboriginal Artist - Lloyd Jampijinpa Brown
  • Community - Yuendumu
  • Aboriginal Art Centre - Warlukurlangu Artists Aboriginal Corporation  
  • Catalogue number - 2663/21
  • Materials - Acrylic on linen 
  • Size(cm) - H122 W76 D2  
  • Postage variants - Artwork posted stretched and ready to hang
  • Orientation - Painted from all sides and OK to hang as wished

This Jukurrpa tells part of a long and complex story of the travels of a group of Dreamtime Women, of all ages, who travelled thousands of kilometers from near the Western Australia/Northern Territory border through into Queensland. It is a journey about country, women’s business, ceremony and survival. On the journey from west to east they would stop and hold ceremonies. They stopped at a place just north of Yuendumu, where they held a ceremony and where they killed and ate wardapi or goanna before continuing on with their journey. This painting shows the women dancing and singing, and women with their digging sticks gathering tucker. You can also see the goanna they killed and ate. In contemporary Warlpiri paintings traditional iconography is used to represent the Jukurrpa. In this painting, ‘U’ shapes represent karnta (women) and vertical lines represent karlangu (digging sticks). You can also see the goanna they killed and ate.

Lloyd Brown is the grandson of Paddy Japaljarri Stewart, one of the founding artists of Warlukurlangu Artists and one of the main painters of the famous Yuendumu School Doors. He was born in Alice Springs and has all of his life living in Yuendumu an Aboriginal settlement located 290 kms north west of Alice Springs. Lloyds favourite pastime is singing in one of the local bands. He also loves playing football and is a keen supporter of the Yuendumu Magpies. He often goes out hunting for traditional animals with his family in the country surrounding Yuendumu. He first started painting for the art centre on small canvas boards which are given to the school children as part of the art centre cultural maintenance program during the school holidays. He has been painting on canvas since 2002. He paints the stories that have been passed down to him for millennia, these stories relate directly to Llody's traditional country, the animals and features which are commonly found in those places. Lloyd also helps out at the Art Centre, assisting with the preparation of art canvasses.




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