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  • Rosie Nangala Flemming, Yankirri Jukurrpa (Emu Dreaming) - Ngarlikurlangu, 30x30cm
  • Rosie Nangala Flemming, Yankirri Jukurrpa (Emu Dreaming) - Ngarlikurlangu, 30x30cm
  • Rosie Nangala Flemming, Yankirri Jukurrpa (Emu Dreaming) - Ngarlikurlangu, 30x30cm
  • Rosie Nangala Flemming, Yankirri Jukurrpa (Emu Dreaming) - Ngarlikurlangu, 30x30cm | Aboriginal Art  | Art Ark - 4
  • Rosie Nangala Flemming, Yankirri Jukurrpa (Emu Dreaming) - Ngarlikurlangu, 30x30cm | Aboriginal Art  | Art Ark - 5
Rosie Nangala Flemming, Yankirri Jukurrpa (Emu Dreaming) - Ngarlikurlangu, 30x30cm
Rosie Nangala Flemming, Yankirri Jukurrpa (Emu Dreaming) - Ngarlikurlangu, 30x30cm
Rosie Nangala Flemming, Yankirri Jukurrpa (Emu Dreaming) - Ngarlikurlangu, 30x30cm
Rosie Nangala Flemming, Yankirri Jukurrpa (Emu Dreaming) - Ngarlikurlangu, 30x30cm | Aboriginal Art  | Art Ark - 4
Rosie Nangala Flemming, Yankirri Jukurrpa (Emu Dreaming) - Ngarlikurlangu, 30x30cm | Aboriginal Art  | Art Ark - 5

Rosie Nangala Flemming, Yankirri Jukurrpa (Emu Dreaming) - Ngarlikurlangu, 30x30cm

$139.00
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  • Artist - Rosie Nangala Flemming
  • Community - Yuendumu
  • Art Centre/Community organisation - Warlukurlangu Artists Aboriginal Corporation
  • Catalog number - 2600/17
  • Materials - Acrylic on pre-stretched canvas
  • Size(cm) - H30 W30 D3.5
  • Postage variants - Artwork posted stretched and ready to hang.

This particular site of the Yankirri Jukurrpa, (emu Dreaming [Dromaius novaehollandiae]) is at Ngarlikurlangu, north of Yuendumu. The ‘yankirri’ travelled to the rockhole at Ngarlikurlangu to find water. This Jukurrpa story belongs to Jangala/Jampijinpa men and Nangala/Nampijinpa women. In contemporary Warlpiri paintings traditional iconography is used to represent the Jukurrpa, associated sites and other elements. Emus are usually represented by their ‘wirliya’ (footprints), arrow-like shapes that show them walking around Ngarlikurlangu eating ‘yakajirri’ (bush raisin [Solanum centrale]). In the time of the Jukurrpa there was a fight at Ngarlikiurlangu between a ‘yankirri’ ancestor and Wardilyka (Australian bustard [Ardeotis australis]) ancestors over sharing the ‘yakajirri’. There is also a dance for this Jukurrpa that is performed during initiation ceremonies.

Rosie Nangala Fleming was born around 1928, at the time when many Warlpiri and other Central and Western Desert Peoples were living a traditional nomadic life. With her family she travelled around the country in the traditional way, visiting sacred sites and learning about her ancestors, her creation stories and her country. She and her late husband came from their ancestral country to live in Yuendumu when it began as a settlement sometime in the late 1940's. As a young woman, Rosie Nangala began working for Mrs Fleming, a Baptist missionary who assisted her in establishing a Warlpiri Women's museum at Yuendumu in the late 1970's, as a keeping place for ceremonial objects and a centre for women to meet. Rosie became president of the museum and administered it for many years. Rosie Nangala made artifacts, seed necklaces and mats for a number of years and when Warlukurlangu Artists Aboriginal Corporation, an Aboriginal owned and governed art centre, was established in 1985, Rosie was one of the first women to paint with acrylic on canvas. She paints her mother’s and her father’s Jukurrpa stories, stories which relate directly to her land, its features and animals. These stories were passed down to her by her father and mother and their parents before them for millennia. Her Dreamings are ngapa (water) from her mother’s side; and warlukurlangu (fire) and Yankirri (emu) from her father’s side. Every week day Rosie comes to the art centre, sits with her friends and paints. She still likes to go hunting when she can.