Your artworks
  • Tjanpi basket, Lala West, Mirlirrtjarra (31-32cm) | Aboriginal Art  | Art Ark - 1
  • Tjanpi basket, Lala West, Mirlirrtjarra (31-32cm) | Aboriginal Art  | Art Ark - 2
  • Tjanpi basket, Lala West, Mirlirrtjarra (31-32cm) | Aboriginal Art  | Art Ark - 3
  • Tjanpi basket, Lala West, Mirlirrtjarra (31-32cm) | Aboriginal Art  | Art Ark - 4
Tjanpi basket, Lala West, Mirlirrtjarra (31-32cm) | Aboriginal Art  | Art Ark - 1
Tjanpi basket, Lala West, Mirlirrtjarra (31-32cm) | Aboriginal Art  | Art Ark - 2
Tjanpi basket, Lala West, Mirlirrtjarra (31-32cm) | Aboriginal Art  | Art Ark - 3
Tjanpi basket, Lala West, Mirlirrtjarra (31-32cm) | Aboriginal Art  | Art Ark - 4

Tjanpi basket, Lala West, Mirlirrtjarra (31-32cm)

$165.00
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  • Artist - Lala West
  • Community - Mirlirrtjarra
  • Art Centre/Community organisation - Tjanpi Desert Weavers
  • Catalogue number - 439/15
  • Materials - Woven Basket -
  • Size(cm) - Diameter 31x32cm Height 7-8cm

Tjanpi (meaning ‘dry grass’) evolved from a series of basket weaving workshops held on remote communities in the Western Desert by the Ngaanyatjarra Pitjantjatjara Yankunyjatjara Womens’ Council in 1995. Building on traditons of using fibre for medicinal, ceremonial and daily purposes, women took easily to making coiled baskets. These new-found skills were shared with relations on neighboring communities and weaving quickly spread. Today there are over 400 women across 28 communities making baskets and sculptures out of grass and working with fibre in this way is firmly embedded in Western and Central Desert culture. While out collectng desert grasses for their fibre art women visit sacred sites and traditional homelands, hunt and gather food for their families and teach their children about country. Tjanpi Desert Weavers is Aboriginal owned and is directed by an Aboriginal executive. It is an arts business but also a social enterprise that provides numerous social and cultural benefits and services to weavers and their families. Tjanpi’s philosophy is to keep culture strong, maintain links with country and provide meaningful employment to the keepers and teachers of the desert weaving business.

Made from a combination of native desert grasses, seeds and feathers, commercially bought raffia (sometimes dyed with native plants), string and wool, Tjanpi artworks are unique, innovative and constantly evolving. Some baskets and sculptures contain raffia which is purchased in Australia, imported from Madagascar. Natural hanks of raffia can sometimes be dyed with commercial dyes and less often with natural dyes. Most popular grass used in artworks is Minarri (greybeard grass, Amphipogon caricirus)

Lala grew up in the Warburton mission. She is a strong leader in her community and has had much involvement on many different councils including being the chairwoman of the NPY Women's Council several mes and the first women elected to the Ngaanyatjarra Shire. She first started making baskets in 1995. Her work is notable for its well executed style and shows some influence of the early missionary coage cra styles. She has produced work for the Manguri Weaving Collecon which is held by The Araluen Art Centre Alice Springs. She has been in many group exhibitons. She has shown innovave periods in her work especially with the basket covered with crotched wool which is in the Manguri collecon.

We realise that it's not always easy buying artworks sight unseen but we are so confident that you're going to absolutely love them when they turn up that if for any reason you change your mind or you're not feeling the feng shui you can return them within 14 days for a full refund.

We happily provide free registered post on all of our paintings within Australia and $30 for international postage. A $15 premium is applicable for the safe packing and registered postage of our 3D items.